Windows Home Server Users Guide (Experts Voice)


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Boot from the WHS installation disc and kick off the install wizard. Now choose the drive s that are in the machine. The amount of time it takes to complete will vary between systems. Count on the entire process taking a minimum of one hour and perhaps longer. There is nothing needed from you while the install takes place. You can administer the machine from any computer on your network after installing Windows Home Server Connector on the other machines. It connects your computers to WHS, allows for automatic nightly backups, monitors computer network health, and enables you to remotely administer the server from your computer.

NET Framework 2. In this instance we can see one of the machines on the network has its firewall turned off. There are a few other features here to like having the password remembered, password hint, and resetting the console. If you need to make more detailed changes to your server, another good option is to use Remote Desktop , which is easier than hooking up a monitor, keyboard, and mouse to it. Now that installation is complete we need to add all the of the latest updates from Microsoft.

This will provide you with the latest server security updates and Power Pack updates as well. Power Packs are updates that add new features and provide fixes to known issues for Windows Home Server. This guide should get you started using your new Home Server. It comes in handy in a lot of cool ways if you want to centralize your digital entertainment and access it from any machine running XP or above. Or if you have a home or small office and want to be able to access your work from anywhere there is a web connection.

Over the next year we will be bringing you more detailed tutorials on how to set up and use your Home Server. Change the scope for each of the required services and programs. In the Change Scope dialog box, you can change the scope from My Network Subnet Only, the default, to either Any Computer, which also includes computers that are located on the Internet, or Custom List, which enables you to limit the scope to a custom list of computers.

Choose the Custom List option and enter the IP addresses of the computers on the other subnets, in the format You can get the IP address of each machine by typing ipconfig at a command prompt on each machine. After you have changed the scope, click the OK button to save the changes. Resist the urge to take the easiest and riskiest configuration option, Any Computer, because this potentially allows any computer anywhere to connect to your Windows Home Server and take control of it!

Summary In this chapter, you learned how to install the Windows Home Server Connector onto each of your computers. This installation enables you to join each computer to the Windows Home Server and to control the Windows Home Server from those computers. You also learned how to uninstall the Windows Home Server Connector and how to quickly perform a reinstallation. Finally, you learned how to make changes to Windows Firewall to enable computers located on different subnets to connect to your Windows Home Server. In this chapter, you will learn how to connect to Windows Home Server and adjust settings to suit your personal preferences and requirements.

Use whichever method you prefer. If you right-click this icon, you will be presented with a menu, which is often referred to as a context menu, as shown in Figure Context menus are provided to help you perform certain tasks or give you certain options, depending on what you were doing or selecting at that time.

The Windows Home Server icon on the task tray Figure These options will become available when they are applicable, hence the context nature of the menu. Selecting Copy to create a desktop shortcut Next, move your mouse pointer to anywhere on the desktop that is empty, right-click, and choose Paste from the context menu, as shown in Figure Choosing Paste to add your desktop shortcut This simple sequence will add a Windows Home Server Console icon to your desktop, as shown in Figure Now you can quickly launch the Windows Home Server Console by double-clicking this icon.

You will be asked to confirm your action, as shown in Figure Clicking Yes here will not remove the actual Windows Home Server Console application; it will just remove the icon from your desktop. Here, you must type in the password that you created for your Windows Home Server account.

As you may remember, you had the option of creating a password hint, and this is where it can come in handy. Just click the Options button, and then click Password Hint, as shown in Figure Asking for your password hint Your password hint will be displayed, as shown in Figure With any luck, this will be enough of a hint, and you can now enter your password and continue. If it is not, then you have a bit of a problem, and the only way to resolve it is to completely reinstall your Windows Home Server—so try not to forget the password! Viewing your password hint After you have typed in your password, click the arrow to continue.

You will see a progress bar indicating that a connection is in progress, as shown in Figure This process should take only a few seconds; anything longer than that could indicate a problem of some kind. Remember the Windows Home Server password is the default. With this option checked, as it is by default, you need to enter your password only the first time you log in to the Windows Home Server Console.

After that, it is already typed in for you. Just click it to switch it off. To switch it back on, click it again. Anyone with access to this computer will now be able to control Windows Home Server via the console, and there will be nothing you can do to stop it. Needing to enter the password each time should deter some people from gaining unauthorized access—assuming that your password hint is not so obvious that it gives away your password without much effort. After the initial startup, whenever you open the Windows Home Server Console, you will see whatever view appeared the last time you closed the console.

This chapter covers configuring Windows Home Server settings. The other elements within the Windows Home Server Console will be covered in upcoming chapters. But, if you do need to do it, just click the Start button and select Windows Home Server Console from the menu, as shown in Figure Selecting the Windows Home Server Console on the Windows Home Server computer You will notice that this menu has fewer options than you saw earlier on your other home computer.

As you can see, the console running on your Windows Home Server itself looks the same as it does when running on your other computers. As you can see, the window is split into three areas. You can configure the backup time, configure automatic backup management, and run Backup Cleanup. Windows Home Server Settings window To the right of the categories list, the main window pane displays the settings for the selected category.

Below the categories list is a Shut Down button. It can also be used to restart your Windows Home Server, if you need to do that for whatever reason. This can be very useful if your server is hidden away or hard to reach. You will see a message about the lost connection, as shown in Figure If you want to restart your Windows Home Server, you will need to do it the old-fashioned way: press the power button on the computer!

If you clicked the Restart button, your connection to your Windows Home Server will also be terminated; however, you will be able to reconnect after it has restarted. General settings Date and Time You can change the date and time on your Windows Home Server by clicking the Change button, which will bring up the Date and Time Properties dialog box, as shown in Figure From here, you can change the day, month, and year, and also set the time.

On the Time Zone tab of the Date and Time Properties dialog box, you can change the Time Zone setting, if it is set incorrectly or if you move to a different time zone.


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Use the Internet Time tab to ensure that you automatically synchronize your Windows Home Server time with an Internet time server such as time. Make sure the Automatically Synchronize with an Internet Time Server check box is checked, and select a suitable Internet time server from the drop-down list. You can also force a synchronization by clicking the Update Now button.

Changing the date and time Figure This setting is used to display information such as dates, times, currency, and measurements in the format of your preferred language and region. Windows Update As anyone who has ever used Windows knows, Microsoft releases many patches for its software. These patches can include software updates, but the most frequent and important updates are security patches.

It is a very good idea to keep your machine up-to-date with security patches. In the past, you would need to visit the Microsoft Windows Update web site and download whatever patches and fixes you needed. Some people did not know about this site or just did not take the time to keep checking for updates, so important patches would be missed.

This is where Windows Update is extremely handy. The recommended setting for Windows Update is On, as shown in Figure , which downloads and installs updates automatically. Windows Update options You can also perform a manual check by clicking the Update Now button. You may then see a screen showing which updates are being downloaded and installed, as shown in Figure This screen will also display any additional information that may be pertinent to the update, such as a request to confirm a change or a request to validate your copy of Windows as part of the Windows Genuine Advantage program.

Microsoft Windows 10

If you are using legal software, and it has been verified by the Windows Genuine Advantage program, you will be able to receive support from Microsoft, including such things as being able to update your software. Chapter 7 covers backup and restore operations in detail. Backup settings Backup Time The backup time is when Windows Home Server performs the daily backups of all of your connected computers and also performs any maintenance tasks.

The minimum time period is 1 hour, and the maximum is 23 hours. The default setting is a start time of midnight and an end time of 6 a. The idea behind this default is that the computers you want to back up will not be used at this time. If a computer is not switched on or is unavailable for any other reason, it will be skipped this will be recorded in the logs.

Setting the backup time Set the backup start time and end time, remembering that the times are in a hour format. Keep in mind that each computer is backed up one after another, so you must set enough time for this to happen.

Digging deep into Windows 10

The time required depends on the number of connected computers you want to back up. Automatic Backup Management Because daily backups of all of your computers are run, the number of backups and the amount of disk space used accumulates over time. To take the pressure off of you to perform some sort of backup management, Windows Home Server provides automatic backup management. The minimum number is 0 and maximum number is You cannot set a different number of backups to be kept for a computer you might consider to be more important than other computers on your network.

The default settings for days, weeks, and months are all 3, as you can see in Figure This may be perfectly sufficient for your needs. For more information about backups, including how to stop and start backups, see Chapter 7. Backup Cleanup Backup Cleanup is a utiltity that works in conjunction with automatic backup management to remove old backups that fall outside the set number of kept backups. You can also run Backup Cleanup manually to remove backups that you want to delete. Backup Cleanup runs automatically every Sunday during the hours you have set for the backup time.

Clicking the Cleanup Now button starts Backup Cleanup. You will then be asked to confirm that you are sure you want to perform a cleanup, as shown in Figure Click Yes if you are sure that is what you want to do. You can now monitor the progress of Backup Cleanup, as shown in Figure Performing a manual cleanup Figure Monitoring the progress of a manual cleanup Managing Passwords The Passwords settings, shown in Figure , let you change the Windows Home Server password and set a password policy. You will be presented with the dialog box shown in Figure You can also add a password hint.

Click OK to finish. It must also be a complex password. Try to make the password as long and complex as you can. User Accounts Password Policy You can create a user account password policy that ensures that all user passwords meet certain requirements. Changing the policy affects only new user accounts; existing user accounts will remain unchanged. You can set the account password policy to one of the following levels of security: Weak: Passwords of any length can be created, which means a user would not need to have a password at all.

Medium: Passwords must be at least five characters. This is the recommended setting, but it offers only a minimal amount of protection. If users can have a password with a minimum of five characters, then they will usually go for just five characters, making the password easier to discover. Strong: Passwords must be a minimum of seven characters, and complex passwords are required. For more information about remote access, see Chapter To change the user accounts password policy, move the slide bar to your desired setting you can set it to only Weak, Medium, or Strong—there is no middle ground , as shown in Figure Media Sharing You can control the streaming of media content— music, photos, and videos—from your home server to other devices on your home network, such as an Xbox or other supported digital media receivers DMRs.

For more information about DMRs and streaming media, see Chapter The Media Sharing settings allow you to switch on or off sharing of each of the three media types, as shown in Figure The default setting for all three shared folders is Off. Content can be accessed even by users without a Windows Home Server user account, so be very careful. If you have media content you want to be able to stream to only certain users, you should put it into a folder that only those users can access.

How to Get Windows 10

Configuring Remote Access The Remote Access settings, shown in Figure , allow you to set up and configure remote access to your Windows Home Server and network from other locations, such as the Internet or your work office. Remote Access settings Remote access is a large topic, and even has its own chapter in this book. For more information about how to set up and configure remote access, take a look at Chapter Like remote access, add-ins have their own chapter in this book.

For information about adding and removing add-ins, along with some of the add-ins that should be available, take a look at Chapter See Appendix C for more information. Add-ins settings Accessing Resources The Resources window shows information about Windows Home Server, such as version information, and provides links to various support options, as shown in Figure If you are running an evaluation copy, you can see when it expires, as shown in Figure Windows Home Server operating system information If you have not yet activated your copy of Windows Home Server, you can click the Activate Windows button in order to start that process.

Activating Windows Select whichever method you want to use to activate Windows, and then click the Next button to continue. The most common and easiest method is to activate Windows over the Internet. You must be connected to the Internet before you select this option. You will then be presented with the option to register your copy of Windows Home Server with Microsoft, as shown in Figure Choose whether or not to register, and then click the Next button to continue.

If all is successful, you should then see the Thank You screen, as shown in Figure You will also notice that the Activate Windows button has now disappeared from the Resources window. This will open the document for you to read. You should read the license terms at least once, just so you know what terms you need to follow in order to use the software. Windows Home Server hardware information Here, you can see the make and model of your Windows Home Server, along with information about the processor speed and how much RAM you have.

This information can be useful if you want to determine if you might need to upgrade any of your hardware in the future. Take a look at the latest hardware, in your local computer store or online, and compare it to the hardware shown here. Version Information The Version Information area lists all of the Windows Home Server services that are currently running on your home server, along with the version numbers, as shown in Figure This information can be very useful for determining which services are running and whether you are running the latest versions.

To contact product support, just click this link. You will then be presented with the screen shown in Figure , which advises you that this action should be performed only if the console appears to be nonresponsive. As this is the the case, or at least appears to be the case, click OK to reset the console. If this action does not resolve the problem, reboot your home server itself, and then try to connect again.

Resetting the Windows Home Server Console Losing Your Connection You might lose your connection to your Windows Home Server for any number of reasons, including a problem with the server itself or issues with your network. The Windows Home Server Console will advise you that the connection has been lost, as shown in Figure , and it will automatically try to reconnect your session for you.

You will notice that something is wrong as the whole screen, with the exception of the Reconnecting box, will be in black and white. Attempting to reconnect to your Windows Home Server The reconnection attempt will happen up to 20 times before it effectively gives up trying. Now 20 times might seem like quite a lot, but those attempts happen pretty quickly, so that may not actually be enough time for the problem to be resolved.

If the Windows Home Server Console does not reconnect to your server in that time, try closing down the console and launching it again. If you cannot, but you could before, then it is a network problem. If the ping fails, it might be a problem with the server itself. See Chapter 4 if you need a refresher on pinging the server. Could your server be rebooting following a critical update? Investigating these areas should give you an idea of the source of the problem. Then we focused on the different settings that you can change using the Windows Home Server Console, including password policies and backup schedules.

It is very important to spend some time going through each of the settings, ensuring that you have configured them specifically for your environment. For example, it is of no use to have your backups performed at 1 a. The final section presented some steps for troubleshooting problems connecting to the Windows Home Server Console and to your Windows Home Server. For example, if there are four people in your household, then you need to create four separate Windows Home Server user accounts, one for each person. In this chapter you will learn how to create a user account, set permissions on that account, delete an account if necessary, and synchronize the passwords on your Windows Home Server user account and your normal Windows logon account.

As you may remember from Chapter 4, when you finished installing the Windows Home Server Connector, you saw the message shown in Figure , warning you that your Windows Home Server does not recognize your user account. Windows Home Server does not recognize your user account.

If you click the message, the dialog box shown in Figure appears, telling you that a user account with the logon name of whatever account you are currently logged into your Windows computer as in my case, andrew edney does not exist on Windows Home Server. What this essentially means is that, although Windows Home Server can safely back up your computer for you, you cannot use some of the other features, such as certain shared folders, until you create an account.

By now you should be familiar with logging into the Windows Home Server Console, so go ahead and log in so that you can add an account. A user account for your current logon name does not exist on Windows Home Server. Adding a User Account As mentioned earlier, a user account must be created for each person who will have access to your Windows Home Server.

Once the Windows Home Server Console is up and running, click the User Accounts tab to display the list of user accounts, as shown in Figure The User Accounts list As you can see, there is only one account at the moment, the Guest account. The Guest account is not configured for remote access and is also disabled. You can use the Guest account to give access to shared folders to users who do not have a Windows Home Server account.

Also consider setting a password for the Guest account, because, by default, it does not have a password associated with it. Enter the first, last, and logon names for the new user account. Enter a first name, which is mandatory and can be up to 31 characters in length. Entering a last name is optional. It can also be up to 31 characters in length. You must also enter a logon name.

For example, if my Windows user account on my laptop is Andrew, then my Windows Home Server user account logon name should also be Andrew. This is sometimes referred to as single sign-on SSO. Enabling Remote Access for a user enables that user to access their shared folder, and any other shared folders they have access to, via the Internet.

By default, this option is unchecked, so if you want to enable the account for Remote Access, check the box. For more information about remote access, take a look at Chapter On the Type a Password screen, shown in Figure , enter the password you want to use for the account you are creating, and then re-enter it to confirm you have typed it correctly.

You will also see here the password requirements, which you may remember from the previous chapter. If you left the password requirements at the default setting, then you have to create a password with a minimum of five characters. If you have changed these requirements, they will be shown here and you need to adhere to them.

Click Next. Set your password. On the Set Access to Shared Folders screen, shown in Figure , set access privileges to all of the available shared folders: Music, Photos, Public, Software, and Videos, along with any other shared folders that may appear, depending on when you perform this step. This is the default setting. Set shared folder access. After you have set all the shared folder privileges, click Finish. The user account is created, access to the existing shared folders are set in line with whatever options you selected, and a new shared folder specific to that user is created on Windows Home Server.

When the new user account has successfully been created, you see the Adding the New User Account screen, as shown in Figure Click Done to complete the process. The account has been created for you. You should now repeat the entire process to create a user account for every person who will need access to your Windows Home Server, although you are limited to ten accounts, not including the Guest account. If you try to create more than ten accounts, you will receive a warning telling you that you have reached the maximum number of user accounts, as shown in Figure You have added all the accounts that are allowed.

Removing a User Account You may decide at some point to remove a user account, perhaps because you have used all of your ten user accounts. It is very easy to remove a user account, and you can also choose whether or not to remove the personal shared folder for that user. If you decide not to remove the folder, you can give someone else access to it. To remove a user account, follow these simple steps: 1. On the User Accounts tab, click the user account that you want to remove. Click the Remove button. You are advised that you are about to remove the selected user account from your Windows Home Server and that you are also about to delete the shared folder for that user, as shown in Figure Click Finish to remove the account and delete the shared folder.

You can observe this process taking place, as shown in Figure When the process has completed, click Done to close the wizard. You then can assign access rights to another user, or choose not to let any other user account access that shared folder and have the Windows Home Server administrator modify access at a later time, as shown in Figure If you want to reassign access rights to another user, choose that user from the drop-down list and click Next.

Confirm the removal of the user account and shared folder. The user account has now been removed. You are advised that you are about to remove the selected user account from your Windows Home Server. You are also advised that you are about to reassign rights to the shared folder for that user to a different user, as shown in Figure , unless you chose the option to not let any other user account access the shared folder, in which case you see that no user account will have access to the shared folder.

Click Finish to remove the account and reassign access rights to the shared folder. Click Finish to confirm the removal of the user account. This is useful if you only want to temporarily prevent a user from accessing shared folders on Windows Home Server. There could be many reasons for doing this.

For more information on how to do this, take a look at Chapter 9. To disable a user account, perform the following steps: 1. On the User Accounts tab, right-click the user account that you wish to disable. Click Disable Account on the context menu, as shown in Figure Choose Disable Account to disable a user account. You are asked to confirm you want to disable the user account, as shown in Figure Click Yes to disable it. Confirm that you want to disable a user account. To re-enable a user account, perform the following steps: 1.

Right-click the user account that you wish to enable. Click Enable Account on the context menu, as shown in Figure Choose Enable Account to enable a user account. To open the properties of a particular user account, either double-click that user account or select the user account and then click Properties. You then see the Properties dialog box for the selected user account, as shown in Figure If you want to change the user account password, click the Change Password button to open the Change Password dialog box, shown in Figure Enter the new password conforming to whatever password requirements are set up , enter it again to confirm, and then click the OK button.

The other Properties dialog box tab is the Shared Folder Access tab, shown in Figure , which lists all of the shared folders and their current access rights. On this tab, you can easily change the access privileges to any of the shared folders. You can choose between Full, Read, and None, just as before. Notice that the user account you are looking at is shown in bold. Entering both might not seem like a big deal, but if that user accesses a lot of shared folders on a regular basis, then it can become a real pain and waste a lot of time.

All they need is the Windows Home Server Console installed on their computer. If the passwords do not match, then you will see the Passwords Do Not Match warning message, as shown in Figure This message will appear when your computer detects the Windows Home Server on your home network. Your passwords do not match. Ensuring that the passwords match certainly makes more sense from an ease-of-use perspective, but if you are concerned about security and would prefer a different password, you can ignore this message and leave things as they are.

If you want to update the password, you have the choice either to keep your password on the Windows computer and change your password on your Windows Home Server user account or to keep your password on your Windows Home Server user account and change your password on the Windows computer. To keep your Windows computer password and change your Windows Home Server user account password, follow these steps: 1.

Right-click the Windows Home Server Console icon in the task tray and click Update Password in the context menu, as shown in Figure Choose Update Password from the context menu. Choosing to keep the password on the Windows computer 3. Enter your password for the Windows computer in the first box. Enter your password for the Windows Home Server user account in the second box.

Click OK to continue. The password on your Windows Home Server user account will then be changed for you, and you should see a confirmation of this event, as shown in Figure Click Close to finish. Your password has been updated. Choose to keep your Windows Home Server user account password. Your password on the Windows computer will then be changed for you, and you should see a confirmation of this event, as shown in Figure Summary In this chapter, you learned how to create a user account for access to shared resources on your Windows Home Server. You learned why it is useful for the logon name and password to match, and how to ensure that they do match.

You have also seen how to disable and delete accounts when necessary and how to use the password wizard to set your passwords for you. As long as you have recent backups, you know that you can easily and quickly recover in the event of a major problem. This chapter explains how to back up and restore data using Windows Home Server. How Do Backups Work? It might be quite useful, or at least fairly interesting, to understand how the Windows Home Server backups actually work.

Would you believe by magic? I will try to explain how they work as simply as possible. Those three computers combined use a total of around GB of disk space. Most backup software operates at the file level, backing up each individual file. In contrast, Windows Home Server operates with clusters. Clusters are the lower-level constructs of the file system and are usually very small—around 4KB. Windows Home Server examines each cluster on each computer that you want to back up and stores only one copy of that cluster, even if it is on all three of those computers.

For example, if the Windows Vista operating system files are on all three computers, Windows Home Server stores one copy of that cluster. Along with the cluster, the backup stores information about that cluster, including on which computer s it is found. This fantastic technology is known as single-instance storage. Each time a backup takes place, Windows Home Server checks the data for that machine against the data in the existing backups and will back up only the data that has changed since that last backup.

It has been around for a while and is in use in all different types of software. If you use Microsoft Exchange at work for your e-mail, you are already using single-instance storage. For example, say you sent an e-mail message with an image attached to it to everyone in your office. This works only when the e-mail message and the attachment are stored on the server. If you were to download that message to your computer, additional copies of the message and attachment would be stored on your computer.

As shown in Figure , this tab displays a list of all of your home computers that have the Windows Home Server Connector installed, with four columns of information. To view the Computer Name tab of the System Properties dialog box, right-click the Computer icon on the desktop and click Properties. Those messages are accompanied by colored status lights: gray for off, green for backed up, yellow for no backup in last x days, and red for not backed up or no backup performed after a longer period than the previous x days used for yellow.

All backups—whether they completed successfully or failed—will be listed here. The padlock shown next to the date in the example indicates that the backup will be kept until you choose to have it deleted. You can go through each of the backups in the list and select any one of those options. The default option for normal automated backups is to manage automatically, which is accordance with the settings you have defined for keeping backups. You can also choose to view the details of any of the backups by clicking the Details button.

This will open the Backup Details dialog box, as shown in Figure The Backup Details dialog box displays various useful pieces of information, such as the status, the description Manual Backup in the example , which volumes were backed up, and which files were excluded from the backup. Right-click the computer for which you want to turn off backups and select Turn Off Backups. If you select this option, backups will be switched off for that computer.

You can easily switch backups back on by right-clicking the computer again and selecting Turn On Backups. If you want to perform a manual backup on a computer, you must first turn on backups for that computer. This could be for any number of reasons, including that you no longer have that computer or you have used all ten of your computer licenses. To remove a computer, click it, and then click the Remove Computer button above the list. You will then be warned that all backups will be deleted from the Windows Home Server, as shown in Figure The computer will then be removed from the backup set.

You can easily change the backup configuration or create a new backup configuration from the Windows Home Server Console. This includes adding or excluding volumes and excluding specific folders. However, if you want to change the backup window, you must do this through the Settings option within the Windows Home Server Console, as described in Chapter 5. Follow these steps to create or change a backup configuration: 1. Start the Windows Home Server Console. You can create or change the backup configuration for another computer other than the one you are currently using, as long as it is switched on and connected to the network.

You can easily tell if this is the case because any computer not switched on and connected is grayed out. Click the Next button to continue. The wizard will collect some information about the chosen computer. This could take a few moments, so be patient. You will then see a list of all of the available volumes that can be backed up, as shown in Figure You will also see the capacity of each volume, how much space has been used, whether or not it is an internal or external drive, and its status.

Choosing which volumes to back up 5. Ensure there is a check in the box for each volume you want to back up. If you want that drive backed up, you should consider converting it to NTFS. You will see a list of folders that are automatically excluded from the backup, as shown in Figure As you can see, certain folders are excluded because they are not really important and can safely be ignored.

Folders that are automatically excluded from the backup process 7. Click the Add button in order to specify other folders to be excluded from the backup. A list of all folders on that volume will appear, as shown in the example in Figure Choosing folders to exclude 8. Work through the list of folders and highlight the ones you want to exclude, and then click the Exclude button.

If you change your mind about excluding any folders, just click the Cancel button. Note that you cannot exclude the root folder from the backup. If you try, you will see a warning advising you to cancel the whole disk backup instead, as shown in Figure Any folders you have selected will be displayed along with the folders that were automatically selected for you. Make sure you are happy with the excluded folder list, and then click Next to continue.

You will see the final wizard screen, which shows a summary of what you are backing up, as shown in Figure Review this information. Click the Done button to finish. Warning telling you that you cannot exclude the root folder Figure This is to avoid a power drain on the laptop during the backup process.

Make sure your laptop is plugged into the power outlet before leaving it to be backed up automatically. Performing a Manual Backup Now that your automatic backups are configured and you have set a time frame that you are happy with, you can rest easy knowing that your computers will be backed up regularly. But wait—what if you want to perform a backup before the usual backup window? Suppose that you just created a load of new files or imported some new digital camera pictures, and you want to back up those files immediately.

Well, you are in luck, because you can run a manual backup at any time. This will have no effect on your automatic backups—they will still take place as scheduled. You can start a manual backup from within the Windows Home Server Console or from the task tray. Choosing to start a manual backup from the task tray 2.

Enter a description for this backup, as shown in Figure You can leave the description as Manual Backup if you wish, but replacing it will certainly make things easier for you if you later need to restore files from this backup. Entering a description for the manual backup 3. Click Backup Now to start the backup. You will see a message informing you that the backup is starting, as shown in Figure Message balloon telling you that the backup is starting You can click the message balloon to view the backup status. If you missed the chance to click it here, you can right-click the Windows Home Server task tray icon which has now turned blue and choose View Backup Status, as shown in Figure Choosing to view the backup status from the task tray Next, five backup status windows are displayed in sequence, as shown in Figures through You will see the backup starting, Windows Home Server determining which files and clusters have changed since the last backup took place, the backup data being sent to the Windows Home Server, and finally that the backup has completed.

The backup is starting Figure Determining which files have changed Figure Determining which clusters have changed Figure The backup has completed. You will also see a message balloon telling you that the backup is complete, as shown in Figure , regardless of whether or not you are viewing the backup status.

The advantage of starting a backup from the console is that you can choose to back up any of your computers, as long as they are currently switched on and connected to your home network. From the Windows Home Server Console, click the computer you want to back up, and then click the Backup Now button above the list. You will be asked to enter a backup description, just as when you start a backup from the task tray, as shown in Figure Everything that follows is the same as if you started the manual backup from the task tray, rather than from the Windows Home Server Console.

The only difference is that you can also view the status of the backup from within the Windows Home Server Console, as shown in Figure At any point during a backup, you can choose to stop it by right-clicking the computer name and choosing Cancel Backup, or by clicking the Cancel Backup button in the Backup Status dialog box. If you do choose to cancel the backup, you will see a message balloon telling you that the backup was canceled, as shown in Figure You are also given the option to run the backup again by clicking the message balloon.

You can do that if you wish, or you can just run a manual backup again later when you are ready. Fortunately, this is a rare occurrence and is usually accompanied by some additional information that will help you to diagnose the problem and correct it before trying to perform another backup. During the course of a manual backup, the backup on the computer I was using failed. A message balloon appeared with a message saying that the backup failed because of an error reading data from my hard drive, as shown in Figure A message balloon advising of a failed backup The same error message appeared in the Backup Status dialog box, as shown in Figure It is useful to view the backup status messages, as you may not see the message balloon.

It will appear and disappear again in only a few seconds, so if you happen to be away from your computer at the time, you could miss it. Another message balloon will appear, telling you that the most recent backup for that computer was not successful, as shown in Figure This message advises you to look at the details of the backup to try to determine the problem.

Look through the list of backups until you find the failed backup, or latest failed backup if you have more than one, as shown in Figure Viewing all the backups for the computer Click the failed backup, and then click the Details button in the Manage Backup section of the dialog box. This will display the details of the failed backup, as shown in Figure You can try the suggestions that appeared earlier when the backup failed.

You may also want to investigate the problem further, which could mean looking at Windows event logs. You will see a list of helpful topics on this subject. When I ran the manual backup again, it was successful. Restoring Files and Computers We have now covered backing up your computers, and you should be quite comfortable with both manual and automatic backups. So what happens if you need to actually restore a file or a number of files because you accidentally deleted something you needed or because some files have become corrupted?

Or how about if you need to restore your entire home computer? As long as you have your backups, you can do both types of restore operations through the Windows Home Server Console. However, you can use the Windows Home Server Console from any of your home computers, and then just copy the files over to the computer where you want the files. Follow these steps to restore selected files: 1. Work through the list of backups until you find the one you want to restore, and then click it. Next, click the Open button in the Restore or View Files section of the dialog box, as shown in Figure Selecting the backup from the list of available backups 4.

If the backup contains more than one volume, you will be asked to select which volume you wish to open from a drop-down list, as shown in Figure Selecting the volume from the list of available volumes 5. If this is the first time you have tried to open a backup file, you might be asked to install some device software from Microsoft, as shown in Figure You will only need to install this once per computer.

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It is used to open the backup file and display it as though it were another drive on your computer. You need to install some device software to open a backup file. It may take a few minutes for the backup to be displayed on your computer. You can monitor the progress while you are waiting, as shown in Figure Monitoring the progress of opening the backup file 7.

When the backup file has opened, it will be displayed in Windows as though it were a normal drive in this example, as a local disk with the drive letter Z , as shown in Figure Search through the folders in the backup until you locate the file or files you want to restore. Viewing the contents of the backup file 8. When you have copied all of the files you want, click the X in the top-right corner to close the window. You should find that your backup has been restored to the location you specified. Restoring a Home Computer A time may come when you need to do more than just restore a few files.

You may need to restore your entire computer, just the system volume, or even just a data drive. Performing a restore could be for any number of reasons, including a failed hard drive or a serious virus infection on your computer. You can restore a system volume only back to the original computer where it was backed up. Usually, the process of restoring a computer can be quite painful and time-consuming. It can mean starting from scratch—reinstalling the operating system, installing drivers, performing updates, applying security patches, reinstalling applications, reconfiguring applications, and then getting your data back.

As you can imagine, or even remember, this can be quite painful. If you have backed up your computer to your Windows Home Server, restoring it is quite a simple process that requires only the Windows Home Server Home Computer Restore CD and any specific drivers you might need. Any changes that were made to your computer, including any files that may have been created, will not be part of the recovery. This is why you should back up each of your computers on a daily or other regular basis. Starting the Restore Process The home computer on which you want to perform the restore must be connected to your home network with an Ethernet cable; a wireless connection will not work.

Make sure you have connected an Ethernet cable to your computer before you continue with the following steps.


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  • Ensure the Windows Home Server is switched on and connected to your home network chances are you will never switch it off! An ISO image is a file that contains everything needed to perfectly duplicate the contents of a disc. When your computer starts to boot from the CD, after a few minutes, you will be presented with the screen shown in Figure This process may take a few minutes; essentially, your computer is being prepared for the restore process.

    Eventually, you will be asked to select your regional and keyboard settings, as shown in Figure Select the time and currency format from the drop-down list. Select the keyboard or input method from the drop-down list. When you are happy with your selections, click the Continue button. Selecting your regional and keyboard settings 5. The restore process will now detect your network connection and hard drives attached to the computer, as shown in Figure In order to check that all the hardware has been detected properly, click the Show Details button.

    It is also equally important that your hard drives are functioning correctly in order to recover the backup. You will see all of the detected network devices and storage devices, as in the example shown in Figure Check that your devices have been detected correctly. If some devices are missing, continue to the next section. Detecting your hardware Figure If you are missing any drivers, they are most likely the network drivers or the storage-device drivers. After all, you could be recovering your computer because of a hardware failure. In that case, after you have replaced the faulty piece of hardware, start the restore process again.

    It is also a good idea to check all of the connections to the hardware; it is very easy for a cable to become loose. From the Detect Hardware dialog box, click the Install Drivers button. You will then be asked to insert a USB flash drive or a floppy disk that contains the drivers for your missing hardware, as shown in Figure This is because, during the backup process, Windows Home Server creates a folder called Windows Home Server Drivers for Restore and places all relevant drivers into that folder.

    In order to copy those files to either a USB flash drive or a floppy disk, you need to be at one of your computers that has the Windows Home Server Console running on it. Then click the specific backup you are going to use and click the Open button in the Restore or View Files area of the dialog box in the same way as when you recover single or multiple files. The backup file will then be opened and the files displayed, as shown in Figure If you open the Windows Home Server Drivers for Restore folder, you should see a number of folders similar to those shown in Figure This is just a quick check to ensure they are there and have been copied over.

    After you have inserted either the USB flash drive or a floppy disk, click the Scan button to begin the scanning process to locate the missing drivers. If the drivers are located and installed, you can continue the restore process. If the drivers cannot be found, you will see a message to that effect, as shown in Figure Click OK to close the message box. Now you can either try again using a different USB flash drive or floppy disk, or recopy the drivers and attempt to load them again.

    When you have loaded all of the correct drivers, you are ready to continue, so just click the Continue button in the Detect Hardware dialog box. Unfortunately, no drivers could be found. Starting the Restore Computer Wizard 1. You will be asked to enter the Windows Home Server password, as shown in Figure

    Windows Home Server Users Guide (Experts Voice) Windows Home Server Users Guide (Experts Voice)
    Windows Home Server Users Guide (Experts Voice) Windows Home Server Users Guide (Experts Voice)
    Windows Home Server Users Guide (Experts Voice) Windows Home Server Users Guide (Experts Voice)
    Windows Home Server Users Guide (Experts Voice) Windows Home Server Users Guide (Experts Voice)
    Windows Home Server Users Guide (Experts Voice) Windows Home Server Users Guide (Experts Voice)
    Windows Home Server Users Guide (Experts Voice) Windows Home Server Users Guide (Experts Voice)
    Windows Home Server Users Guide (Experts Voice) Windows Home Server Users Guide (Experts Voice)

Related Windows Home Server Users Guide (Experts Voice)



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